Surgeons can be color blind


Leave the archive and display this page in the standard design: Doctor despite color weakness ?????



Evening people
I have a small discussion group (5 men / women) at my home and can use n few opinions from you.
I myself am active in the medical service, 2 of my colleagues are prospective doctors, and the others are also something weird in that direction. Now my roommate got it into his head that he wants to start studying med although he has "slight" problems with color recognition. We have already tried with the Ishihara color table (?? right ??) to find out what he can't see and came up with strange results: sometimes he has a red-green weakness, sometimes the blue is added, sometimes there is nothing but that doesn't change the fact that he has problems with the color gradations. He says he sometimes looks n green like n yellow and something like that. But enough with the description. Since I am of the opinion that people with color recognition problems have nothing to do in the medical service. my "doctors" colleagues are of divided opinion, I wanted to put the question in the forum here to see what the masses think about people in the service of medicine with color problems.
Would be very happy about a lively participation ... oh yes ... to say that my roommate is an exceptional talent in natural sciences, which partly underpins the opinions of others that he could possibly compensate with this talent ... well. do you break your heads ersma ..: - party

I'm sure there are enough doctors out there who don't even know they have a color weakness.

Where should the problem be? My former surgical boss has a pronounced red-green weakness, is a wonderful, downright virtuoso surgeon and just asks the operating room nurse or the assistant during biliary operations, for example, whether what is flowing is blood or bile ... I don't see any problems with that at all.

So I would operate immediately.

Hmm ... but don't you think that color vision is necessary in some situations? We are partly convinced that he could possibly misjudge cyanosis or that he could have problems during his studies in history courses or similar courses.
But already a plus that there are really doctors who are already working with a weakness and are allowed to do so. I didn't think so.
@someone: What do you mean operate? Eyes out and new ones in?

Find a connection to science far more important than color vision. We have enough homeopaths that we can allow ourselves even more "blind people" ...

No problem in Histo either: he always sees the same way. I mean: He is not color-blind overnight, but he has the weakness all the time. He then learns the history differently, more according to patterns. Or just in his colors :-)) And if you actually have to recognize in an exam what color that is, then he knows the color as he knows it again :-)
Nor does he fail to see the cyanosis. But just the way he sees her.
Everything is relative.

Hmm ... but don't you think that color vision is necessary in some situations? We are partly convinced that he could possibly misjudge cyanosis or that he could have problems during his studies in history courses or similar courses.
But already a plus that there are really doctors who are already working with a weakness and are allowed to do so. I didn't think so.
@someone: What do you mean operate? Eyes out and new ones in?

If he deals with it openly and has colleagues and fellow students who support him, then he will also learn to deal with weakness in color.
Then he just knows that this strange color he sees is exactly color X.

Then he just knows that this strange color he sees is exactly color X.

The problem is that it's not a weird color, rather certain colors are indistinguishable. They just look the same to someone with color blindness.

And I don't think that's a major handicap. In a bio lecture with us, the professor pointed to the wall with his early laser pointer and asked if there was anyone who couldn't see this point. Normally there would always be a few students with red-green weaknesses. So can't be anything out of the ordinary. :-)

At least nobody checks whether he has such a weakness. It may well be that he has to come up with something in one subject or another during his studies.


And afterwards he should just choose a subject where it is least restrictive.
For example cyanosis: It's not that common now, the patient usually has other corresponding symptoms (e.g. proper dyspnea) and the doctor is rarely alone in such a situation.

Overall, it certainly also depends on the extent of the color weakness. He can have it tested exactly by the ophthalmologist.

If it goes after that, no doctor should practice if he has a cold and can't smell anything, because then he might miss a pioneering smell (our forensic doctor wants to pretend).

However, if you cannot distinguish between yellow and green pus ....: - oopss: -oopss: -biscuit

if he really wants to become a doctor, then under no circumstances should it fail because he is color blind !! that is really not the restriction that could prevent the exercise of the profession!

We are partly convinced that he could possibly misjudge cyanosis
I do not think so. Take a look at a high-resolution black and white picture of a cyanotic patient who even looks sick in monochrome.

The cyanosis is clear to me, I often have to do with it .. I gave a really stupid example, but we had no better idea. But still there is always the possibility that he e.g. in acute situations wrong conclusions a.G. draws his weakness or ??
The thought with the ophthalmologist came to us too, he wants to do that in order to even have black and white what is actually broken with him because, as I said, the color tables gave a comscihes result.but well ... I'm curious what because I still come for opinions because I always like to learn about the openness in this regard.

But still there is always the possibility that he e.g. in acute situations wrong conclusions a.G. draws his weakness or ??

Yes, there is a possibility. But every doctor has some weaknesses and therefore regularly makes wrong decisions. That's the way it is, where people work, mistakes happen. Whether this is because the doctor cannot see any colors or is sometimes a little unfocused, it comes out the same in the end. Of course, it is important to minimize mistakes. But when I find out every day that some doctors give arbitrary diagnoses over the phone and prefer to send a KTW over instead of even looking at the patient, then I think that one should start eliminating mistakes at another end.

So he shouldn't be a nuclear medicine doctor (they have colored pictures), and neither should he become a pathologist (they have colored pictures). Otherwise it shouldn't really matter.

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